From Canon 7D to Canon 6D in Bangkok

I started my journey into the world of DSLRs with the Canon 450D, as it can be seen on the first posts in this blog. It did not really last very long, the appeal of the new Canon 7D was too hard to resist and I went from the relatively small Canon 450D with the kit lens 18-55mm to the relatively big Canon 7D with the Canon lens 24-105mm f4.

Canon 450D and Canon 7D in Bangkok

I was very happy with the Canon 7D and still am actually, except for one thing, the noise at high ISO. The level of noise starts to be noticeable when you are as low as 800 ISO, which is quite troublesome if, like me, you take quite a few pictures in low light. So when the Canon 5D MKIII, and a bit later the Canon 6D, came out, I was pretty tempted to switch to one of them. Initially I thought the 5D would be the way to go but reading reviews after reviews, I got convinced that the 6D was the one for me: lighter, ability to accurately focus in low light, same capability at high ISO for both of them, the GPS and the wireless connection as added bonuses… Did I mention the price?

And so here is the Canon 6D, with the Canon lens 24-105mm f4 , next to the Canon 7D with the Canon 135mm f2.  Not much of a difference in terms of size on the picture below although the 6D is actually a bit lighter than the 7D.

Canon7D and canon 6D in Bangkok

And off I go in the streets of Bangkok, still having the Canon 24-105mm fitted on the 6D.

Canon 6D in Bangkok

I was going to the Chatuchak market in Bangkok in order to buy a few gifts for Christmas. That would allow me to test the low light capabilities of the Canon 6D, the alleys in the market being usually quite dark and requiring a high ISO setting. Here is a wooden Buddhist monk on display in one of the handicraft shop.

Wooden Budhist Monk - Canon 6D with Canon lens 24-105mm

Of course, the Canon 24-105mm with the f4 limit is not really the lens I intended to use in low light conditions, it would indeed often require pushing the ISO a bit too high. The two lenses I intended to use were the Canon 50mm f1.4 and the Canon 135mm f.2, two perfect lenses for taking portrait pictures with a full frame body like the Canon 6D.

Here are some pictures, at ISO 1250 to ISO 1600, with the Canon 50mm f1.4 first.

A portrait of a cute Thai toddler taken home in the evening.

Portrait of a Thai toddler with Canon 6D and Canon 50mm f1.4

Do you think I can take that can from you?

Portrait of a Thai toddler with Canon 6D and Canon 50mm f1.4

Our son doing his homework on the floor in the evening.

Portrait of a Thai Eurasian  with Canon 6D and Canon 50mm f1.4

Portrait of a Thai Eurasian with Canon 6D and Canon 50mm f1.4

A few weeks later, Christmas time in Europe

Portrait of a luk kreung with Canon 6D and Canon 50mm f1.4

Portrait of a Thai Eurasianr with Canon 6D and Canon 50mm f1.4

Not a portrait, something I’m lucky enough to get prepared by my wife in Thailand, from time to time. I love Thai food but not Thai food only.

Steak with potatoes in Bangkok with Canon 6D and Canon 50mm f1.4

And the last one for today, with the Canon 6D and the 50mm f1.4, is a portrait of a Sacré de Birmanie

Portrait of Sacré de Birmanie  with Canon 6D and Canon 50mm f1.4

Let’s now switch to the Canon 135mm f2, one of the best lenses of Canon and one that was my favourite with the Canon 7D, and is now even more so with the Canon 6D. Here is the Sacré de Birmanie again keeping me company early morning.

Portrait of Sacré de Birmanie  with Canon 6D and Canon 135mm f2

The Canon 135mm f2 allows you to be a bit further away from the subject than with the Canon 50mm f1.4, which is a welcome advantage when you’re trying to take a picture of a toddler without him wanting to grab your camera.

Portrait of a Thai toddler with Canon 6D and Canon 135mm f2

The fast focusing of the Canon 6D also helps for kids always on the move.

Portrait of a Thai toddler with Canon 6D and Canon 135mm f2

And the last one for today, taken in the evening in Bangkok, with the Canon 6D and the Canon lens 135mm f2.

Portrait of a Thai Eurasian with Canon 6D and Canon 135mm f2

In conclusion, I am extremely happy with the Canon 6D, it does exactly what I was expecting it to do, and more. I actually did not think the noise would be that low up to ISO 1600, barely noticeable. Two of the features I did not use yet are the GPS and the wireless connection, I do not really need them, but you never know, it could be useful one day.